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BBC News: Education

Manchester bombing led to 11th-hour changes to exam papers

More than 2,000 papers were checked for distressing content after the bombing and at least two were changed.

North Ronaldsay Primary School loses its only pupil

The primary in Orkney will be kept on standby from August after its only pupil moved on to secondary.

Academy funding falling for secondary pupils

The income of academies for secondary pupils is lower than four years ago, official figures reveal.

Baby removed from vulnerable mother 'unlawfully'

The child was taken into foster care while on a supervised visit with its father.

'Action needed' on Wales teacher shortage

Secondary school training centres recruited 538 students in 2016-17, 38% short of the 871 target.

£4.8m spent to educate Republic of Ireland students in NI

The executive had previously sought compensation for teaching students from the Republic.

Sugar tax 'must not be used to plug school budgets'

Money earmarked to improve children's health should not be used for shortfalls in England's school funding, say councils.

Campaign to avoid confusion over new GCSEs

An information campaign wants to make sure people understand a new way of grading GCSEs in England.

Top of the BBC news items

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Department for Education

Collection: Letters to academy trusts about poor performance

Updated: Added 7 pre-warning notices, 7 warning notices and 1 termination notice issued between February and July 2017.

You can find a copy of the most recent notices we’ve issued to academies on this page. See the ‘List of letters to academy trusts for poor performance’ for a full record of all the notices we’ve issued.

Transparency data: Academy trusts: notices about poor performance

Updated: Added 15 pre-warning and warning notices for February to July 2017.

The pre-warning notice or warning notice letters from the Department for Education to academy trusts are also available.

Detailed guide: PE and sport premium for primary schools

Updated: Added details about funding for 2017 to 2018.

Most schools with primary-age pupils receive the PE and sport premium in the academic year 2017 to 2018, including:

schools maintained by the local authority academies and free schools special schools (for children with special educational needs or disabilities) non-maintained special schools (schools for children with special educational needs that the Secretary of State for Education has approved under section 342 of the Education Act 1996) city technology colleges (CTCs) pupil referral units (PRUs provide education for children who can’t go to a mainstream school) general hospitals

The following types of school don’t receive this funding:

nursery schools studio schools university technical colleges (UTCs) independent schools (except for non-maintained special schools, which do receive the funding) Funding for the PE and sport premium

Schools receive PE and sport premium funding based on the number of pupils in years 1 to 6.

In cases where schools don’t follow year groups (for example, in some special schools), pupils aged 5 to 10 attract the funding.

In most cases, we determine how many pupils in your school attract the funding using data from the January 2017 school census.

If you are a new school or a school teaching eligible pupils for the first time in the academic year 2017 to 2018, we will base your funding on data from the autumn 2017 school census.

Funding for 2017 to 2018

Schools with 16 or fewer eligible pupils receive £1,000 per pupil.

Schools with 17 or more eligible pupils receive £16,000 and an additional payment of £10 per pupil.

We will publish the school level breakdown of funding for the academic year 2017 to 2018, including conditions of grant, in October 2017.

Funding for 2016 to 2017

Schools with 16 or fewer eligible pupils receive £500 per pupil.

Schools with 17 or more eligible pupils receive £8,000 and an additional payment of £5 per pupil.

The breakdown of funding for the academic year 2016 to 2017, including conditions of grant, is available.

Payment dates for 2016 to 2017 Maintained schools, including PRUs and general hospitals

Maintained schools, including PRUs and general hospitals, do not receive funding directly from DfE. We give the funding to your local authority and they pass it on to you.

We give local authorities PE and sport premium funding for maintained schools in 2 separate payments. Local authorities receive:

7/12 of your funding allocation on 29 October 2016 5/12 of your funding allocation on 27 April 2017

If you are a new maintained school or if you are teaching eligible pupils for the first time in the academic year 2016 to 2017, local authorities receive:

7/12 of your funding allocation on 31 January 2017 5/12 of your funding allocation on 27 April 2017 Academies, free schools and CTCs

The Education Funding Agency (EFA) sends academies, free schools and CTCs their PE and sport premium funding in 2 separate payments. You receive:

7/12 of your funding allocation on 1 November 2016 5/12 of your funding allocation on 1 May 2017

If you are a new academy, free school or CTC, or if you are teaching eligible pupils for the first time in the academic year 2016 to 2017, you receive:

7/12 of your total funding allocation on 1 February 2017 5/12 of your total funding allocation on 1 May 2017 Non-maintained special schools

EFA sends non-maintained special schools their PE and sport premium funding in 2 separate payments. You receive:

7/12 of your funding with the first payment you have scheduled with EFA after 1 November 2016 5/12 of your funding with the first payment you have scheduled with EFA after 1 May 2017 How to use the PE and sport premium

Schools must use the funding to make additional and sustainable improvements to the quality of PE and sport they offer.

This means that you should use the premium to:

develop or add to the PE and sport activities that your school already offers make improvements now that will benefit pupils joining the school in future years

For example, you can use your funding to:

hire qualified sports coaches to work with teachers provide existing staff with training or resources to help them teach PE and sport more effectively introduce new sports or activities and encourage more pupils to take up sport support and involve the least active children by running or extending school sports clubs, holiday clubs and Change4Life clubs run sport competitions increase pupils’ participation in the School Games run sports activities with other schools

You should not use your funding to:

employ coaches or specialist teachers to cover planning preparation and assessment (PPA) arrangements - these should come out of your core staffing budgets teach the minimum requirements of the national curriculum - including those specified for swimming (or, in the case of academies and free schools, to teach your existing PE curriculum) Get advice

Visit Sports Coach UK’s ‘coaching in primary schools toolkit’ for advice on employing sports coaches for your school and for guidance on the activities sports coaches can help you with.

Watch short films on the Sport England website for more advice on using the PE and sport premium effectively. Sport England produced these films in collaboration with the Association for Physical Education, the Youth Sport Trust, County Sports Partnership Network, Sports Coach UK and Compass.

Find out what works in schools and colleges to increase levels of physical activity among children and young people.

You can also contact your local county sports partnership (CSP) for support with spending your PE and sport premium.

Accountability Ofsted inspections

Ofsted assesses how primary schools spend their PE and sport premium. You can find details of what inspectors look for in the ‘Ofsted schools inspection handbook 2015’. Read the section on ‘effectiveness of leadership and management’.

Online reporting

You must publish details of how you spend your PE and sport premium funding on your school’s website.

You can download a tool to help you measure and report on the impact of your spending from:

The Association for PE Youth Sport Trust

Collection: Improvement notices and directions

Updated: Moved West Berkshire council improvement notice to 'closed notices' group.

These notices and directions are issued to councils due to ‘poor’ or ‘inadequate’ performance.

Decision: Improvement notice issued to West Berkshire council

Updated: Updated to show that DfE lifted the improvement notice on 7 July 2017.

DfE issued the notice following Ofsted’s judgement that children’s services provided by West Berkshire council were inadequate. The notice required West Berkshire council to address all the areas for improvement identified in the inspection report published on 18 May 2015.

We lifted the improvement notice on 7 July 2017.

Research and analysis: Post-16 education: funding and expenditure review

A review of funding and expenditure arrangements for post-16 vocational programmes in:

Denmark France Germany the Netherlands Norway

Research and analysis: Transnational education: value to the UK

Updated: Added 2017 research report 'Transnational education: the wider benefits to the UK'.

Transnational education is education provided in a country different to that of the awarding institution.

These reports look at:

the effect on students undertaking transnational study the benefit to UK higher education institutions the benefit to the UK as a nation

Research and analysis: Education-related exports and transnational education ...

Report providing experimental estimates of the total value of exports from the UK education sector, and the respective contribution of the higher and further education sectors.

Transnational education is education provided in a country different to that of the awarding institution.

Top of the DFE news items

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Education Guardian

Labour’s Angela Rayner: ‘I’m proper working-class and Jeremy Kyle’

The shadow education secretary has had a remarkable rise from a Stockport council estate, and endured appalling abuse along the way. Is she right that someone of her background could never become PM?

‘Aren’t the children quiet,’ says the shadow education secretary, Angela Rayner, to a group of parents at a community centre in Crewe. They have com...

Trojan Horse affair: remaining disciplinary proceedings dropped

NCTL decision means only one in 15 teachers who faced action banned from classroom in Birmingham schools furore

The government has given up its two-year-long attempt to ban teachers caught up in the Trojan Horse affair in Birmingham, after those in the remaining cases were told disciplinary action against them has been halted.

Fifteen teachers and...

North Ronaldsay: school with no pupils highlights plight of isolated islanders

Residents of remote Orkney island say mothballing of school shows community is dying due to lack of infrastructure


Residents on one of Scotland’s most remote islands have pleaded for extra support after its school, the smallest in the UK, was mothballed when its only pupil left.

Islanders of North Ronaldsay, the most northerly of the Orkney island...

Share your stories of working while studying at university

Tuition fees and rising living costs mean many students are taking paid work to make ends meet. We want to hear your experiences

It’s not just tuition fees that make education expensive – rising living costs and a lack of financial support mean many students struggle to make ends meet while studying at university.

There are signs that more and mor...

Not all PhD supervisors are natural mentors – some need training

My supervisor’s high standards and cold manner made me feel inadequate. If only he had been taught how to encourage me

When I told my graduate supervisor that I wanted to join his lab, he blinked at me and said, “Do you think you can handle it?” I was overwhelmed by self-consciousness as a wave of cold anxiety rushed through me. My inner voice sc...

The British empire’s hidden history is one of resistance, not pride | Priyamv...

Modern apologists would have us misty-eyed over the empire era. Instead we should celebrate the many forgotten voices who spoke out

• Priyamvada Gopal teaches in the Faculty of English at the University of Cambridge

Some news never gets old. Twitter recently gave fresh life to a 2014 YouGov poll when imperialism’s leading televangelist, Niall Ferg...

Five heads are better than one: the schools joining forces in tough times

Funding cuts and narrowing curriculum options are prompting schools to share space, teachers and expertise to improve what they offer

Two years ago, a diminishing budget saw one Essex comprehensive take an unwelcome step – cutting the number of A-level subjects on offer to its pupils. “My rule of thumb was that if less than 10 students opted for ...

Official estimates of international students in UK 'potentially misleading'

Research by government’s statistics watchdog casts doubt on supposed high level of students overstaying their visas

Official estimates of international students remaining in the UK are “potentially misleading” and should be treated with caution, according to the government’s statistics watchdog.

The investigation into the quality of long-term stud...

Top of The Guardian news items

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